mood

Rachelle's Take on Happiness Boosting Supplements | for Well+Good

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… “These are all exciting products, but herbalist and certified holistic health coach Rachelle Robinett wants people to keep things in perspective. “If only we could stop looking for our magic bullet,” she says. “Something I always tell people is that if they are going to spend all their money on herbs or supplements, their diet and lifestyle need to be in a good place. You have to check those boxes first,” she says.

“There also many potential reasons why a person could be unhappy, Robinett says—undiagnosed health conditions like gut or hormonal imbalances, mental health issues, external stimuli, etc. Herbs can only help with some of those conditions, and certain underlying conditions require more help from a trusted practitioner. “This is why it’s important to work with a trained professional if you are truly hoping to change your mood using herbs,” she says. She adds that some herbs, like St. John’s wort, can also interfere with prescription meds, so it’s important to fill your doctor in, too.

“That’s not to say that Robinett thinks the above-mentioned products have no purpose—au contraire! But it’s about understanding that they can be one aspect of an overall healthy lifestyle, not a quick fix. And be patient about seeing results. For example, adaptogens can take up to eight to 10 weeks of daily dosage to truly take effect, she says. “If you do plan on using a product in this way, it’s especially important to look into the sourcing of their herbs, especially with supplements,” she says. With patience, you might see a little extra joy in your future, too.”

Read the full story, here.

VIDEO: Mood-Boosting Snack Delivers Happiness in Every Bite | Plant Based on YouTube

Snacking should make you feel good. (Take that, sugar crash!) But what if I told you that you could make your 3 p.m. snack break even better with a treat that can literally improve your mood in just one bite? Intrigued, right?

In the latest episode of Plant Based, herbalist, health coach, and Supernatural founder Rachelle Robinett shares her recipe for “Dopamine Bliss Balls,” (a.k.a. souped up energy balls) which she says are the perfect pick-me-up for any time you’re feeling a bit sluggish.

The main ingredient in these bliss balls is mucuna pruriens, a.k.a. the “dopamine bean,” which is a legume native to tropical Asia and Africa. They’re dark brown and covered with stiff hairs that contain serotonin, a neurotransmitter that promotes calmness and satisfaction, Robinett explains. The plant is a staple in Ayurvedic medicine, and has been touted as a possible way to help manage depression.

Once dried and ground, the bean produces a powder that contains L-dopa, a direct precursor to dopamine. This helps our bodies naturally produce dopamine, a feel-good neurotransmitter that the brain releases when you’re happy.

“It can raise your mood a little bit, it can give us a little bit of energy,” Robinett says of mucuna pruriens benefits. “But it feels quite different than caffeine—it’s not quite as high and, for some people, mucuna pruriens can actually help with sleep.” Translation: It can be as good for a bedtime snack as it is in the afternoon.

Thankfully, it’s not super hard to reap mucuna pruriens benefits. You can buy the powder online (SunPotion makes it, as does Banyan Botanicals) or at your favorite health food store. Then, use it to make Robinett’s Dopamine Bliss Balls—which you can get if you watch the full video above. You’re that much closer to a happy-making snack.

Quoted in mindbodygreen: Black Cohosh: The Plant That Herbalists Call On For Treating Period Cramps, Sleep Issues & More

“The deeper you dive into the world of herbalism, the more you come to realize that nature has already come up a cure for almost every ailment out there—from headaches to fatigue and beyond. One natural remedy that many herbalists have turned to for centuries is a medicinal plant known as black cohosh. While it hasn't quite gone mainstream in the wellness world, black cohosh has shown potential to help women during their cycle and through menopause and also offer some relief to those struggling with PCOS. Here's everything you need to know about adding it to your plant-powered health arsenal.

What is black cohosh?

“Native to North America, black cohosh (actaea racemosa or cimicufuga racemosa) is also known as bugbane, rattleroot, and black snakeroot. The medicinal plant grows in the Eastern deciduous forest and is wild harvested in the Appalachian and the Ozarks, and its power is packed in its roots and underground stems.

“Black cohosh has been used across the world as a natural remedy for centuries. Algonquins took the herb internally to remedy kidney programs, while the Iroquois used it topically for achy joints to ease pain. In the case of the Cherokees, it was used as a diuretic and treatment for tuberculous and fatigue.”

Read the full story on mindbodygreen.

“And remember that pairing black cohosh with other healthy lifestyle changes will always yield the best results. "Black cohosh can be really helpful for some menopausal symptoms, as well as protecting bones. I'd first suggest a very high-quality (nutrient-dense) plant-based diet for either state, and then consider including black cohosh additionally," shared Rachelle Robinett, holistic health practitioner and founder of Supernatural. Herbs are a powerful tool that can be a part of your overall health journey.”