Education

VIDEO: Celery Juice CBD Lemonade | Plant Based on YouTube with Well+Good

“CBD lemonade? Watch the video for the easy recipe.

From skin-care products to food and tinctures, you can get your CBD just about any way you like. And if you pick up a CBD-infused drink on the reg, herbalist and holistic health practitioner Rachelle Robinett is here to teach you how to make your own in the latest episode of Well+Good’s YouTube series Plant Based.

In this episode Robinett is joined by Lou Sagar, the founder of The Alchemist’s Kitchen. Sagar (who’s a bit of a CBD expert) says that people use the cannabinoid compound for a variety of reasons, including stress, anxiety, menstrual pain and bloating, and muscular or joint pain. (It has a lot of potential health benefits, although of course more research is needed.)

When trying out CBD for the first time, Robinett recommends finding your own dosage by starting low and working your way up. “You want to reach the point where you feel the desired effect,” Robinett says. “If it’s the right plant for you, you’ll get there. If you don’t get the benefit then it might not be the right plant for you.”

However, if the taste of CBD oil straight is just not your thing (don’t blame you there!), Robinett has a solution for you: a celery juice/lemonade hybrid infused with CBD perfect for unwinding in this summer heat. For the recipe, watch the full video above.

Catch up on Plant-Based with this episode on medicinal mushrooms, and this episode on making your own floral-infused water.

This story appears originally at Well+Good, here.

VIDEO: Medicinal Mushroom Salad Dressing | Plant Based on YouTube with Well+Good

Sorry, mushroom coffee, but this salad dressing makes eating medicinal mushrooms way tastier. Watch the video.

When we think mushrooms, we think of the delicious ones that we love on pizzas and in stir fries…and the psychedelic ones that just got decriminalized in Denver. But fun fact: There are over 270 varieties of medicinal mushrooms, and, as herbalist and holistic health practitioner Rachelle Robinett explains in the latest episode of Plant Based, they’re great for immunity and gut health.

“Medicinal mushrooms are immunomodulators, so that means that they help our immune system to function at an appropriate level,” Robinett says—basically, they can help balance your immune system to potentially prevent it from over- or under-reacting. This is achieved thanks in part to compounds called beta-glucans, which are in the cell walls of many medicinal mushrooms. “When we eat [beta-glucan], it travels into our lower intestine and binds to a certain receptor,” she says. There, the beta-glucans tell our immune system to activiate itself with the “appropriate tools,” Robinett says, like T cells, to stay healthy.

She adds that medicinal mushrooms are also fantastic prebiotics—meaning that they’re rich in the starches and fiber that gut bacteria feed on in order to thrive.

The downside of medicinal mushrooms…they don’t taste very good, Robinett says. “It can be really tough to eat medicinal mushrooms in large quantities,” she admits. “So having it in a liquid extract like a tincture or in a powdered form can be awesome.” Her go-to way to eat medicinal mushrooms: working it into a salad dressing. “It’s super super simple to make,” Robinett says, “and such an easy way to have an even more functional, medicinal lunch.”

But where is this recipe, you ask? Well, you’ll have to watch the full video above for the deets.

For more of Robinett’s recipes and herbal intel, be sure to watch the Plant Based episodes that explore making your own floral-infused water and the benefits of mucuna pruriens.

Rachelle's Take on Happiness Boosting Supplements | for Well+Good

happiness supplements herbalist rachelle robinett.png

… “These are all exciting products, but herbalist and certified holistic health coach Rachelle Robinett wants people to keep things in perspective. “If only we could stop looking for our magic bullet,” she says. “Something I always tell people is that if they are going to spend all their money on herbs or supplements, their diet and lifestyle need to be in a good place. You have to check those boxes first,” she says.

“There also many potential reasons why a person could be unhappy, Robinett says—undiagnosed health conditions like gut or hormonal imbalances, mental health issues, external stimuli, etc. Herbs can only help with some of those conditions, and certain underlying conditions require more help from a trusted practitioner. “This is why it’s important to work with a trained professional if you are truly hoping to change your mood using herbs,” she says. She adds that some herbs, like St. John’s wort, can also interfere with prescription meds, so it’s important to fill your doctor in, too.

“That’s not to say that Robinett thinks the above-mentioned products have no purpose—au contraire! But it’s about understanding that they can be one aspect of an overall healthy lifestyle, not a quick fix. And be patient about seeing results. For example, adaptogens can take up to eight to 10 weeks of daily dosage to truly take effect, she says. “If you do plan on using a product in this way, it’s especially important to look into the sourcing of their herbs, especially with supplements,” she says. With patience, you might see a little extra joy in your future, too.”

Read the full story, here.